WORK WITH US |  General Archive |  Suppliers |  Contacts 
it-ITen-GB

The importance of protecting people from physical harm is enshrined in Terna’s Code of Ethics. di Terna. The occupational safety policy sets out its guidelines with an explicit commitment to promoting laccident prevention for all employees, including those employed by contractors.
The system of indicators includes the "occupational safety indicator", comprising the injury rate and the lost day rate, to which the variable remuneration of personnel in the departments concerned is linked.
At last, a specific organisational unit within the Engineering department tests safety materials and devices, assessing their reliability via strength tests under extreme conditions.

BS OHSAS 18001:2007 certified management system

This system, which covers 100% of the Company's activities and is incorporated within the quality and environment system, is based on accurate risk assessment, with a particular focus on activities entailing electrical risk (Provisions for the Prevention of Electrical Risk).

Organisational unit responsible for safety and supervisory activities

This unit, consisting of a central team and local managers in area offices and at construction sites (Prevention and Protection Service managers), carries out inspections of workplaces and construction sites.

The correct and complete application of the procedures is subject to inspections by Prevention and Protection Service managers, internal compliance checks for all Terna Group companies, and the external audits required for certification. Elected staff representatives are also present who are responsible for verifying the application of standards (staff health and safety representatives). As regards activities carried out by contractors, Terna conducts inspections of its own construction sites in order to verify the correct application of accident prevention regulations by the responsible health and safety officers and contractors.

Information and training activities

All staff have access to key information regarding health and safety and innovations through various channels, including the “Safety” section of the Company’s intranet and information meetings. In 2017, around 43,658 hours of training were dedicated to health and safety issues, of which over 60% was aimed at blue-collar workers. The equipment at the Viverone Training Centre (BI) enables training to be carried out on safe working practices when climbing pylons ( via the use of life-size pylons), and regarding live-line working in a controlled environment. In 2017, in collaboration with the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa, a project called "HSE Lab" was launched with the aim of developing in-company knowledge of innovative approaches and tools to improve management and organisational skills in dealing with HSE issues.

Occupational injuries

As in previous years, in 2017 there were no fatal or grave occupational injuries suffered by the Group’s employees. Also with reference to fatal or grave injuries in years prior to the reporting period, there were no cases in which company liability was definitively determined. The total number of injuries was 24. Both the injury frequency rate and the lost-day rate showed a reduction compared to the average for the previous two-year period. The absentee rate confirmed the downward trend.

  • Occupational injuries - Terna employees
  • Occupational injuries - contractor and subcontractor employees
OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES – TERNA EMPLOYEES, GRI-ILO DEFINITIONS(*)

2017
2016
2015
Injury Rate 0.81 1.00 0.84
Lost Day Rate(1) 27.62 31.28 36.13
Absentee Rate(2) 6,239.9 6,831.4 7,186.1
Occupational Diseases Rate(3) 0 0 0
Number of injuries 24 28 24
     - of which serious 1 0 0
     - of which fatal 0 0 0

(*)As required by GRI protocols, the definitions adopted are those provided for by the International Labour Organization (ILO). To facilitate comparison with other sources, the following notes show the figures of the same indicators calculated with alternative formulae. It was not considered necessary to further break down the data by region, because Terna operates only in Italy.

Injury Rate This is the number of injuries with at least one day’s abstention from work divided by the number of hours worked during the year and multiplied by 200,000 (corresponding to 50 working weeks x 40 hours x 100 employees). To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000,000 instead of 200,000 (consequently obtaining an injury rate five times that of the ILO). With this calculation method, the injury rate came out at 4.0 in 2017, 5.0 in 2016, and 4.2 in 2014.

Lost Day RateThis is the ratio between the days not worked owing to injury and hours worked in the year, multiplied by 200,000. Days not worked are calendar days, counted from when the injury occurred. To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000. With this calculation method, the lost-day rate came out at0.14 in 2017, 0.16 in 2016 and 0.2 in 2015.

Absentee Rate.&This is the number of days of absence owing to illness, strikes and injuries out of the number of days worked in the same period, multiplied by 200,000. To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated as a percentage of days worked. With this calculation method, the absentee rate came out at 3.1 in 2017, 3.4 in 2016 e 3.6 in 2015.

Occupational Diseases Rate. This is the total number of cases of occupational disease divided by the hours worked in the year, multiplied by 200,000.

(1) To calculate the lost-day rate, the days not worked related to injuries occurring in 2017 were considered together with any continued absence related to injuries occurring during the previous years, following the criterion of annual accrual of days of absence.

(2) The reasons for absence considered do not include maternity leave, marriage leave, study leave, leave for trade union activities, other cases of paid leave, and suspensions.

(3)In 2017, as in previous years, no cases of work-related illness for Terna employees was ascertained. No hours of absence were ascribable to occupational disease because the type of activities carried out by Terna does not entail any work associated – on the basis of the official legal tables – with the possible onset of occupational diseases. Terna’s occupational disease rate must therefore be considered to be always zero.

The overall picture of all Terna's social data is available for download here.

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES – CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS, GRI-ILO DEFINITIONS

2017
2016
2015
Occupational injuries – contractors' employees 9 8 9
     - of which serious 1 0 1
     - of which fatal 0 0 0
Tasso di frequenza infortuni (Injury Rate)(1) 0.27 0.31 0.43

(1)This is the number of injuries with at least one day’s abstention from work divided by the number of hours worked during the year and multiplied by 200,000 (corresponding to 50 working weeks x 40 hours x 100 employees). To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000,000 instead of 200,000 (consequently obtaining an injury rate five times that of the ILO). With this calculation method, the injury rate came out at 1.3 in 2017, 1.5 in 2016 and 2.2 in 2015.

The overall picture of all Terna's social data is available for download here.