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  • Occupational safety policy

    specifying the guidelines included in the Ethical Code, it expresses the commitment in promoting accident prevention for all employees, including those of the contracting companies. It refers to the importance of ongoing training and the collaboration with the appropriate bodies for continuous improvement.
  • BS OHSAS 18001 certified management system

    integrated with the environment and quality systems, it is based on accurately mapping risks. It consists in an organic and detailed collection of procedures and operational instructions for all safety activities.
  • Safety organizational structure

    formed by a central unit and by local heads in the territorial offices and in building sites that directly inspect and control the work sites.
  • Monitoring activities

    in addition to constantly monitoring employers, the proper and full application of procedures is subject to internal compliance verification with all territorial operational areas. External controls are also carried out for certification confirmation.
  • Safety & Environmental Safety Portal

    includes a complete and updated archive of the legislation on occupational safety. It provides access to a support service for interpreting law provisions and verifying application models, in addition to an archive of verification programs and their relative results. A specific area is being created dedicated to building site management, for constantly monitoring Terna’s contracted work.
  • Information and training activities

    All the personnel is informed of the principal safety notions and novelties, through the corporate Intranet and the organization of informative meetings. The annual training program includes general corporate courses as well as specific integrations at the territorial level based on risk analysis. In 2016, more than 48,000 hours of training were devoted to health and safety, of which over 60% were aimed at the Company’s blue-collar workers.
  • Occupational safety performance objectives

    they are integrated into the monitoring indicator system of corporate activities linked to the variable remuneration of the Departments involved.
  • Applied research

    a specific organizational unit tests the reliability of safety materials and devices, through resistance tests under extreme conditions. 

    Among the 2016 Applied Research Activities:

    Smart Island

    Terna's commitment to the Smart Island initiatives continued. These were begun in June 2015 with the agreement to modernise the electricity grid of the island of Giglio. The Smart Islands projects include the integration of renewable generation, energy storage systems, electrical vehicles and hi-tech solutions for managing active demand on the smaller islands.

    Enviromental sustainability

    As part of the “TSO-DSO” project, development and construction of new dispatching functions continue which could be implemented in automation and control systems installed in substations and at NTG control and operation centres, with the aim of favouring the integration of distributed generation plants from non-programmable renewable energy sources, thereby improving operational security and safety.

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was conducted on 380 kV overhead lines and cable lines with single-stem pylons. An LCA assessment is currently being conducted on direct-current conversion plants (HVDC).

    In regard to the project testing innovative solutions for mitigating low-frequency CEM (electromagnetic fields), following on from tests on the 150 kV Collarmele-Castelmadama line, guidelines were prepared for designing mitigation systems with passive loops, to be applied to HV electricity lines with different voltages.

    In regards to the trial of noise mitigation systems, a pre-prototype system has been tested at the Rome South electrical substation with good preliminary results. Additionally, a second solution with passive dampers has been completed, applied to a newly-constructed single-phase reactor, which has been installed at the Taio electrical substation. This lead to the provision of passive dampers being installed on Terna reactors

    Transmission technologies

    Research and the implementation of high-temperature low-sag (HTLS) conductors on the NTG continues, which are capable of withstanding higher temperatures without suffering mechanical degradation during operating life.

    As part of the development project into re-ignition practices on isolated grids in the absence of local generation, a successful operating test on an island of the Synchronous Condensers at Codrongianos using Storage Lab storage systems was undertaken.

    Testing continues, in the laboratory and in the field, on innovative instrument transformers, which are intrinsically safe, both from an environmental perspective (no oil or SF6) and in terms of the physical safety of people and objects.

    As part of the Mitigating Outage Risks caused by snow and ice project, important introductions have been gradually put in place, which include prevention, maintenance, research and zoning in order to identify the most critical areas, as well as the installation campaign of the anti-rotation devices for conductors and the Wolf-TRASM system (predicts the formation of "sleeves" of ice on overhead lines). A collaboration with the Politecnico of Milano has also been established in order to develop strategies and innovative anti-icing/de-icing systems to mitigate the risk of ice and snow.

    The installation of advanced monitoring systems for HV equipment and machinery at the NTG's electrical substations continue.
    The initial stages of the MOSAICO project have been completed. It aims to define a new operational maintenance model that will allow, within the plants units, for operational stages in the processes of defining demands, planning, scheduling, allocating activities to teams and final accounting to be simplified.

     

  • Occupational injuries

    As in previous years, in 2016 there were no fatal or grave occupational injuries suffered by the Group’s employees. Also with reference to fatal or grave injuries in years prior to the reporting period, there were no cases in which company liability was definitively determined. The total number of injuries was 28. Both the injury frequency rate and the lost-day rate showed a reduction compared to the average for the previous three-year period. The absentee rate confirmed the downward trend.
  • Occupational injuries - Terna employees
  • Occupational injuries - contractor and subcontractor employees

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES – TERNA EMPLOYEES, GRI-ILO DEFINITIONS(*)


2016

2015

2014

Injury Rate

1.00

0.84

1.27

Lost-Day Rate (1)

31.28

36.13

44.16

Absentee Rate (2)

6,831.4

7,186.1

7,092.3

Occupational Disease Rate(3)

0

0

0

Number of injuries

28

24

36

- of which serious

0

0

0

- of which fatal

0

0

0

(*) As required by GRI protocols, the definitions adopted are those provided for by the International Labour Organization (ILO). To facilitate comparison with other sources, the following notes show the figures of the same indicators calculated with alternative formulae. It was not considered necessary to further break down the data by region, because Terna operates only in Italy.

Injury Rate. This is the number of injuries with at least one day’s abstention from work divided by the number of hours worked during the year and multiplied by 200,000 (corresponding to 50 working weeks x 40 hours x 100 employees). To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000,000 instead of 200,000 (consequently obtaining an injury rate five times that of the ILO). With this calculation method, the injury rate came out at 5.0 in 2016, 4.2 in 2015, and 6.3 in 2014.

Lost-Day Rate. This is the ratio between the days not worked owing to injury and hours worked in the year, multiplied by 200,000. Days not worked are calendar days, counted from when the injury occurred. To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000. With this calculation method, the lost-day rate came out at 0.16 in 2016, 0.2 in 2015, and 0.2 in 2014.

Absentee Rate. This is the number of days of absence owing to illness, strikes and injuries out of the number of days worked in the same period, multiplied by 200,000. To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated as a percentage of days worked. With this calculation method, the absentee rate came out at 3.4 in 2016, 3.6 in 2015, and 3.6 in 2014.

Occupational Disease Rate. This is the total number of cases of occupational disease divided by the hours worked in the year, multiplied by 200,000.

(1)       To calculate the lost-day rate, the days not worked related to injuries occurring in 2016 were considered together with any continued absence related to injuries occurring during the previous years, following the criterion of annual accrual of days of absence.

(2)       The reasons for absence considered do not include maternity leave, marriage leave, study leave, leave for trade union activities, other cases of paid leave, and suspensions.

(3)       In 2016, as in previous years, no cases of work-related illness for Terna employees was ascertained. No hours of absence were ascribable to occupational disease because the type of activities carried out by Terna does not entail any work associated – on the basis of the official legal tables – with the possible onset of occupational diseases. Terna’s occupational disease rate must therefore be considered to be always zero.

 

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES – CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS, GRI-ILO DEFINITIONS

2016

2015

2014

Occupational injuries – contractors' employees

9

                                      16

- of which serious

1

3

- of which fatal

0

2

Injury rate(1)

0.31

0.43

0.77


(1) This is the number of injuries with at least one day’s abstention from work divided by the number of hours worked during the year and multiplied by 200,000 (corresponding to 50 working weeks x 40 hours x 100 employees). To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000,000 instead of 200,000 (consequently obtaining an injury rate five times that of the ILO). With this calculation method, the injury rate came out at 1.5 in 2016, 2.2 in 2015, and 3.8 in 2014.